How a password generator can help you create a strong password

Do a quick Google search for “password hacking software”, and you will be shocked (and maybe appalled) at how many people sell programs design to crack your passwords and hack your accounts. You’ll also find questions from people around the world asking, “what are the best ways to hack someone’s password?” These are the people you need to protect yourself against.

Here are the top cybersecurity factors to make a strong password and accessing your accounts:

No names, please

Don’t use your name, first, last or middle, as your password. The three passwords that a hacker will try first is, “password”, “123456” and different combinations of your name. The same goes for the names of family members, pets, friends, etc. A lot of this information is easy for hackers to find and they won’t hesitate to use it against you.

No important numbers

As with names, you shouldn’t use any numbers in your passwords that are easily discovered by hackers, including your date of birth, social security number, phone number, zip code, or anything similar. If you have trouble staying away from names and important numbers, PasswordsGenerator.com has a secure password generator that will take the guesswork out of it for you.

No real words

If it’s in the dictionary, it’s a real word, and it doesn’t belong in your passwords. There is an entire method of password hacking called “dictionary attack” that exploits people’s tendency to use dictionary words in their passwords.

Sharing is not caring

Don’t log in to important accounts on shared computers (your home-family computer is fine, as long as you trust everyone at home). This includes library computers, shared office computers, etc. The same goes for public internet connections, like a public wifi hotspot at a coffee shop, web proxies, free VPN, or Tor.

“S” is for Secure

A strong password is no good if you transmit it willy-nilly. Only send sensitive information if you’re on a secure connection. A secure connection will say either “HTTPS” (as opposed to HTTP) or “SFTP” (as opposed to FTP). These connections are encrypted and much more difficult to hack than their counterparts.

Don’t lose your passwords

Encrypt and store your passwords in a few different locations. That way, if you lose access to your computer or account, you can get your passwords back quickly and easily.